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    Thoughts on your office environment for Earth Day 2013

    earth day.jp

    Today is Earth Day, and all over the world more than 1 billion people are celebrating by driving green initiatives like cleaning, planting and recycling. On this special day activists, governments, and NGOs try to drive more awareness about the current environmental issues and what we can do to help protect our Earth and preserve our natural resources.

    Though green issues such as climate change have become a major part of our daily life, many people still find it difficult to sustain it in their working environments. Business Printing is one of the areas where you too can make a difference. We can’t give up printing and in fact it is our duty not to, but how we print is what makes all the difference when it comes to our impact on the environment. So today we are going to show you in three simple steps how your business can score double by cutting down its printing cost and carbon foot print at the same time.

    Smarter printing

    At first glance it may be hard to see how moving print from a specialist supplier to in-house could have such a dramatic impact both on costs and on carbon emissions. The explanation, though, is simple: if you print in-house then you print precisely what you want, when you want it and where you want it. You might call this smarter printing.

    Every business requires stationery: letterheads, invoice blanks and so on. Traditionally this stationery is pre-printed in advance, and because of the economies of scale when using an external supplier, items are usually ordered in large quantities. You pay for a large amount of paper, tying up cash. You spend energy moving it from the print shop to your premises and, if you have multiple locations, to probably pay again to move it from the headquarters to these other branches. You have to provide storage for it and if any detail changes – a new address, membership of a new trade body, an update in the corporate identity, maybe the addition of your environmental certification details – then the paper is just scrap to be delivered (more carbon) to a recycling plant.

    So, why outsource when you can do it in house?

    Online information

    The last few years have seen a marked change in the way that brochures and data sheets are used. Gone now are the days when if someone was interested in a product they called the company who put a glossy brochure into an envelope and mailed it. Today the expectation is that all this information will be available on the web, and while brochures still exist they are formatted to be downloaded and printed out remotely.

    Again there is no need to print large quantities of brochures in advance. If you need ten copies to display in a reception area, print out ten copies. If you need 100 copies for an exhibition then print out 100 copies. And if the exhibition is in Las Vegas or Beijing then print them there, rather than shipping them around the world. This provides more benefits than you can shake a stick at. It saves money and it reduces the carbon footprint, but it also means that you can make changes to your document as they happen.

    Managed printing

    These real savings are realised readily, by taking a managed approach to printing. Identify what your requirements are and install the hardware you need to support it accurately. The network design will ensure that staff has access to the right printer at the right time. Multi-page documents should be routed to duplex devices for double-sided printing to halve the paper cost.

    These are simple steps but can deliver cost savings to a business of as much as 30%. By printing what you need exactly when you need it you eliminate waste, and by printing what you need at the exact location you need it you save the cost, and environmental impact, of shipping it.

    While achieving best environmental practices can be challenging for a business, particularly in the current climate, there are areas where going green does not inevitably cost money. Taking a fresh look at printing can be good for your business while fulfilling your Corporate Social Responsibility at the same time.

    Print Control: How to Manage your Printing Cost

    There are lots of ways through which businesses can save on printing cost. Print Control, a utility provided by OKI for free, allows you to track printing operations at the office and provide reports and stats on printing usage. It allows you to monitor the usage of both individuals and groups of people.

    Print Control helps you to plan your printing policy and decide who get to print what.  For example; it allows you to grant print access to authorized personals only or restrict printing to monochrome. You could also assign a limited number of printed pages for your employees and also limit the number of pages printed in colours or even limit the time of print use.

    Print Control provides various options that help you manage you printing and hence achieve effective cost control. It is particularly useful for small and medium businesses which follow strict budget.

    Watch the video below to learn more about Print Control and how it can help SMBs

    Why Switch to In-House Printing?

    It’s no secret that in-house printing is one of the messages we keep emphasising everywhere we go. But with the research, surveys and constant dialogue we have with business owners, we always get the same result – lots of money is being spent on outsourcing business printing requirements that can be easily avoided by switching to in-house printing.

    The problem here is that many business owners still think that it is hard to move printing in-house and that it won’t provide the same high quality results outsourcing does.  Could they ever be more wrong!

    In-house printing is doable with the right tools and Oki’s Template Manager makes undertaking a wide range of printing tasks almost ridiculously simple. Template Manager comes with ready designed templates  for banners, business cards, letterheads and many other example as shown below

    In-house printing is not a hassle, it’s quite the opposite; you can avoid printing in large quantities which you are forced to do when out sourcing. So with things like letterheads, invoices and  business cards, you can exactly print the amount you need when you need it and where you need it. Your marketing materials such as; banners, flyers and brochures can easily be printed in-house with utilities like Template Manager.

    In-house printing  helps you save lots of money wasted on stack of printed materials saved in storage till needed and which you might end up throwing anyway if you changed any of the information like your P.O.Box, contacts or logo …etc.

    So why should anyone switch to in-house printing? Because it helps you become more efficient and it saves you both money and time.

    If you still have some second thoughts about in-house printing listen to our John Ross elaborating  more on in-house printing and template manager.

    Printing Policy for a ‘Paper-Less’ and more Efficient Office

    A clear printing policy can help you increase business efficiency

    As a printer vendor, people get quite surprised when they hear us talking about ‘Paper-Less’ office! But just because we sell printers, doesn’t mean we encourage printing more unnecessary paper.

    There are several aspects of the business that, if handled properly, could let you hit two birds with one stone; increase your office efficiency and save money. Printing is easily overlooked when we are considering these two areas and that’s why having a clear printing policy is essential, after all sometimes it is the small things that count.

    So what is a printing policy?

    A company’s printing policy is a guideline intended for employees to follow in order to apply the best printing practices at the office. It usually covers issues such as restricting the use of colour or ensuring that double-sided printing is used whenever possible. Unfortunately, too many organisations lack a basic printing policy for staff.

    In a recent survey which we conducted across EMEA*, we found out that 68.7% of the people surveyed don’t have a printing policy in their companies and only 24% do. Also in companies where printing policies do exist they are often ignored or poorly publicised. This is starkly illustrated by the fact that in  businesses with printers offering a double-sided, duplex facility; only 15% of employees ‘always’ used it. Conversely, 60% of staff with access to colour, ‘always’ or ‘often’ use the colour option, yet in the vast majority of office environments most standard print needs can be adequately accommodated in mono.

    Introducing better print management techniques at the office would have a greater impact on the corporate bottom line, with potential savings of up to $19,600 million.** With the right management and infrastructure, printing tasks can be done faster and with less waste; saving precious manpower and materials not to mention increasing the business efficiency.

    Here are just few points you could include while planning your printing policy

    –    Proofreading: Always make sure your staff proofread the documents before printing for spelling mistakes or any errors to avoid re-printing
    –    Double-Sided printing: Set double-sided printing as default and where possible advice staff to print two or four up (printing two or four pages on one sheet, works best with power point presentations)
    –    Colour Printing: Restrict printing in colours except when needed and set black and white printing as default.
    –    Print Range: Don’t print a 10 page document when you only need a couple of paragraphs or pages. Make sure you set your print range before printing.
    –    Recycle: Reuse single sided sheets  and incoming faxes for notes
    –    Disclaimer: Apply the ‘think before you print’ email disclaimer on all your outgoing e-mails.

    These are just a few points to help you get started but the most important thing is to involve your staff in the development of the printing policy; ask them for suggestion to give them a sense of ownership. The key here is to put in place a pragmatic and enforceable printing policy, each individual user will be able to operate in a way which remains convenient to them yet takes account of the cost to the broader business and the environment.

    *OKI Printing Solutions Survey: ‘So what exactly do you print?’
    **cebr Survey: ‘Outsourced printing- A waste of paper?’ – An analysis of cost savings achievable around EMEA from in-house printing and improved print management

    Business Efficiency … Your Key to Success

    By: John Ross, GM

    Smart printing is the key to print savings

    We recently held the OKI Business Efficiency Seminar in Dubai to discuss ways to boost efficiency in the workplace and enhance productivity. The seminar also saw the launch of our new range of OKI colour printers, the C300 and C500 series. The event covered the areas of new efficiencies in finance, resource management and innovation and took a practical look at tools to help businesses drive for greater efficiency. We brought in expert speakers from different parts of the business world to look at the whole scope of improving business efficiency.

    It’ll come as no surprise when we reveal that Oki’s contribution revolved around print, but there are some very real savings to be made by conducting a relatively fast and simple analysis of business printer usage.

    Let’s look at some independent research on printing in the UAE alone.

    • The annual print bill for UAE businesses is around AED 6,238 million
    • Some AED 1,136 million is spent every year on outsourced printing
    • The average office worker, according to the US Environmental Energies National Laboratory, responsible for printing 10,000 pages a year, using 12kg of paper (source)

    So the main question here is how to make printing effective and efficient at the workplace.

    Smart Printing is the answer, the recent Centre for Economics and Business Research (cebr) report commissioned by OKI showed earlier that a country like the UAE can save up to $110 million and spare the environment 9,000 tonnes of CO2 if business printing was more efficiently managed.

    Management doesn’t know what is printed at the office, how often it’s printed or how much it cost, so the first step towards achieving efficient printing is to investigate the printing process at the workplace. You need to ask yourself the following questions:

    –       How many pages do you print?

    –       How many in color and how many B&W?

    –       How can print be controlled?

    –       What can be printed in-house rather than sending out to a print shop?

    Nowadays and thanks to advanced technology several printing vendors provide you with the tools that can help you improve your printing process and increase business efficiency. At OKI for example, within every network printer and MFP box we supply, free of charge, solutions to increase your print effectiveness.

    Tools such as; Print control, print supervision and secure print, can help you control who is printing what and how, which can help you control your costs. Also tools like Template manager allows you to print stuff like business cards, flyers, brochures and banners which helps you to shift a major part of your printing in-house.

    Here are some of the cost savings that can be achieved by business sectors in the UAE with smart printing

    © centre for economics and business research ltd,

    In conclusion we can say that smart printing is good for business, environment and the economy, if best practice was applied across the UAE, businesses can save between AED 238 million and AED 540 million and the region’s economic output would rise by AED 724 million.

    So the next time you start reviewing your business and identify ways to boost your efficiency and productivity; don’t overlook printing!

    If you have the time, please take 3 minutes to answer our survey on Business Efficiency

    http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NKTX6KF

    

    OKI Business Efficiency Seminar

    The OKI Business Efficiency Seminar is held at the Arjaan Rotana on Monday 12th July @4:00pm and focuses on a number of areas intended to help you make a difference in how effectively you manage your business.

    Join us for a couple of hours of educational, entertaining & interactive sessions. We’ll also be taking the opportunity to launch the latest Oki colour products: the C300 & the C500.

    The event will feature a number of speakers of vast knowledge and expertise in Finance, Management, Innovation, Sales Training and Information Technology.

    First Speaker:               Binod Shankar, Genesis Review

    How to efficiently manage your budget

    Second Speaker:          Carol Talbot, Matrix Training Solutions

    A head start in 2010

    Third Speaker:             Jennifer Baxavanis, BAX Consultancy

    Sales training and its direct impact on productivity

    Fourth Speaker:           Vivienne Strettle, KVS Consultancy

    Staff empowerment and motivation

    Fifth Speaker:               John Ross, OKI Printing Solutions

    Efficiency in printing management

    The event is followed by a cocktail reception.

    To reserve your seat, please register here (free admission): http://cpilive.net/nl/2010/it/oki/registration.aspx

    You can help us with this survey about, oddly enough, business efficiency: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NKTX6KF

    How to move printing in-house

    OKI printer producing 1.2m banner and CD covers

    A recent study by leading business research body the Centre for Economics and Business Research (cebr) has suggested that businesses in the EMEA region could save a staggering $25,000 million by changing the way they manage their printing, and in particular by bringing more of their print requirements in-house.

    While it may not necessarily be well quantified in any management system, print is a large element in any company’s overheads. The US Environmental Energies National Laboratory estimates that each worker is responsible for 10,000 printed pages a year, equivalent to 50kg of paper.

    It makes sense to reduce the amount of print that is required, and to minimise the cost of that printing. The cebr study suggests that, by implementing a modern approach to document handling and bringing as much in-house as is practical, businesses could expect to save as much as 30% of their costs overall.

    It is important to understand that these savings are attainable without compromising in any way the quality of the print work. Changing the print policy depends on taking advantage of recent developments in both document handling and printer technology: there is now no reason why you should not achieve consistently high quality results in-house.

    In summary, the principle is to print just what you need, when you want it, where you want it. It boosts cashflow, saves storage space and distribution costs, ensures accuracy and timeliness, boosts efficiency and greatly reduces waste. Here are just a few ways in which print costs can be saved.

    Do not outsource the print of letterheads or invoice blanks, or any other standard stationery. There is absolutely no need to have two print processes when one would do, and printers from innovative companies like OKI Printing Solutions are perfectly capable of accurately printing logos and layouts within tight colour tolerances.

    Keep brochures and data sheets online, which is where most customers expect to find them now. They can download and (if they need to) print them at their premises; you can print just those copies you need, for display or for special purposes such as an exhibition. It means you can keep the information up to date without having to pulp old brochures, and you can be sure there is no chance of old information remaining in circulation.

    Paper has two sides so use them both. Duplex printers for double-sided output are now widely available, fast, and reliable in paper handling. Double-sided printing means half the paper cost.

    Use the right printer for the job. High speed, high volume collating devices are available for when you need multiple copies of a large document, so staff should not need to tie up a desktop printer all day. Save colour printers for colour printing and use a mono printer when you can.

    Guard your commercial confidentiality. Your competitors may use the same print shop chain as you do, printing in-house is much more secure and allows you to keep control of your confidential information.

    In-house printing is about more than plain paper. Today’s printers are comfortable with a very wide range of stock. If you want a glossy brochure – print it onto gloss board. Want to give a presentation a luxurious feel – print it on to high white, heavier paper. Need self-adhesive, sequentially numbered barcode labels for products and packaging, or customised CDs or DVDs – specialist printers can be added to the network for special applications like this, or by using software supplied in the box from Oki a “standard” printer can be used to print variable data.

    Print where you need the copy rather than where the data is; If you want copies of a brochure in Hong Kong, better to print it there than shipping it from the home office (even if it means using an outsourced print shop).

    These seem simple and obvious points but, combined with the latest in print technology from an advanced and innovative supplier like OKI Printing Solutions, they can deliver real results in terms of reducing costs and saving management time. Putting the right print solutions in place boosts staff efficiency and boosts their enthusiasm.

    The brand values of a business are still judged, in part, by the quality of its printed material. The good news is that by applying good print management a business can make worthwhile savings in overheads – particularly significant in this time of financial turmoil – without in any way compromising the quality of its documentation or its impact on potential customers.

    How to buy a printer for your office

    How can SMB get more out of the business? How many times did this question cross your minds? There are four basic aspects to consider; ‘Plan, Process, People and Products’. Without a plan there can be no measures and without a measure there can be no improvement. You have to ask yourself; does the process run the business or support it? Are your people capable, trained and motivated? Does the product that you use do what you want, when you want it in a cost effective manner?  We are not going to focus on strategic planning, nor process control or staff development and retention. Our main concern is products and how they can save money and provide resources and time which will allow you to plan and measure, to validate and modify processes and motivate and develop your staff and your business.

    SMBs are usually concerned with stuff like cash flow, staffing, customers and managing growth. These are the things they classify as critical issues. When it comes to products like printers, they are not on top of mind for SMBs. However, a simple decision like what printer to buy can end up costing money – or providing benefits.

    Recently and thanks to advanced technology in the printing sector many of the SMBs have started to consider the in-house printing option rather than outsourcing their printing needs. If we take a good look at any office printing needs we would find them varying between several things like; official documents, contracts, brochures, letter heads, envelopes, business cards …etc. It’s very easy now to find a printer that meets all business’ needs and requirements. So when buying a printer if a considered decision is taken in a business perspective it can go a long way to saving money, time, and even being a motivational tool.

    The big question now is how to choose the right printer for your business. There are lots of types in the market nowadays; inkjet, Monochrome toner base printers LED/Laser, Colour toner base printers LED/Laser and Multi-function Printers Inkjet/mono/colour. How can you decide which one to buy and which one suits your line of business?

    There is no such a thing as a completely bad printer or a good printer, there is only a suitable printer. Each type of printers has its own pros and cons, the trick is to find out what are these pros and cons then decide upon them how suitable the printer would be for your business.

    Pros and Cons

    Inkjet

    When we talk about inkjet printers we can definitely say that they are cheap in price, they can print in colour and in photo mode they produce good print quality. However, they are very slow. Inkjet printers take more than 1 minute to print one A4 colour image (16PPM for colour toner base). They are very expensive to run and require a special media to deliver good quality printouts.

    Monochrome toner base printers LED/Laser

    Mono printers are reasonably priced; the cost of owning the printer is very economical. They provide fast printing for the business entry level starting at 20PPM and require no special media. Mono printers can print in duplex mode and are network ready, which is preferred for SMB, hence the ability to manage the printing resources and control cost and usage. The only con in mono printers is that they can’t print in colour.

    Colour toner base printers LED/Laser

    Colour printers don’t require special media to deliver good image quality. They are network ready and economical to own. They can print on heavy media that reaches up to 200 gsm in some machines and can print in duplex mode.

    To talk about colour printers cons we can sub classify the technology here to highlight them. Single pass is better than multi pass in terms of media flexibility and speed. Also, one should be aware of the fact that separate toners and drums are better than combined toner cartridge where customers can use the imaging unit to the end of its life regardless of the toner coverage on the page.  Printers that are equipped with tools to manage colour, network and usage, as well as to design templates are better because they are built to be ready out of the box solutions.

    Multi-function Printers Inkjet/mono/colour

    When it comes to MFPs, similar pros of the mono and colour toner base printers apply. In addition, MFPs are able to copy, scan, fax and of course print. In the case of proper SMB products the scanning should be network scanning. MFPs are very cheap when considering buying an inkjet one and reasonably priced when considering a toner base product.

    When talking about cons for the inkjet MFPs, the same cons of the inkjet printers mentioned before apply in this category as well. You should also be aware of none network colour toner base.

    Large format printers

    LFPs are used for specific type of applications like maps, indoor and outdoor banners. They are suitable for some advertising purposes and production houses; some of these organisations can be classified as SMBs. Considerations for purchase include the size of the printout and the set up cost for each print job.

    While LFPs supply the needs for indoor and outdoor large printouts, nevertheless they don’t fulfil all the printing needs and requirements for organisations such as production houses, and there is always a gap in printing small size images and point of sale materials like brochures, business cards, promotional leaflets, CD labels and small banners, which might also be required by their customers

    To avoid such a gap these organisations would require a printer that can address all the above mentioned applications. Some colour toner based printers would definitely be the suitable answer to such printing requirements, for they can print banners up to 120cm, produce very high quality images and print on thick media that reaches up to 300 gm.

    So which printer suits what business?

    Knowing what are the pros and cons of each type would definitely help you in deciding which printer suits your business, however, if you are still not sure about that here is some hints that can help you decide.

    Most of the inkjet printers are more suitable for domestic use and for Graphic Arts users who need high end photo quality products. As for mono printers; they depend on the product of course but they can be addressing SOHO/COHO, SMB, government and corporate use. Colour printers are suitable for COHO, SMB, government, special application market e.g. transfer paper, short run production and Graphic Arts applications. When talking about inkjet MFPs, they are best suited for domestic use or SOHO, while toner base are best for SOHO/COHO, SMB, corporate use and government as well as the special applications e.g. all of the previously mentioned plus document management applications.

    What to consider when buying a printer?

    There are various things you should consider when buying a printer. Of course there are important factors related to the users and the application but when generally speaking there are a few key considerations one should consider such as;

    Cost of ownership: One has to consider all relevant costs before buying a printer for example: consumables (Toner, Image drum, furses … etc.), media and the initial cost of buying the machine.

    Speed: Speed of printing is very important because time is a valuable factor. So when buying a printer one should consider how fast it is and whether this speed is good enough and suitable for business’ requirements.

    Management: For some users it is important to be bale to manage and control the printer, they should make sure the tools required for that are available as well as networkability.

    Media Flexibility: Depending on your business of course you should look for printers that are able to print on irregular media like CD labels, business card media, heavy weight media …etc.

    No one can deny how the SMB market is on the rise and how its business’ requirements are evolving accordingly. SMBs are more interested now in advanced network printers, technologies such as proofing systems and third dimension resolutions. They need the fast, the cost effective and the compact in size printers.

    Printing Vendors should be aware of the quick changes occurring in the market and the technologies required by SMBs. They should provide quicker products, more flexible and easier to use, packed with a variety of soft application that will assist in managing colour, network, printer resources, and make design of office documents as easy as possible.

    The main objective for the printing business now is to develop market leading in-house printing products that anticipate and meet the needs of business customers, whatever their size.

    General buying tips for SMB

    • Consider the price and yield of consumables beside the initial buying price.
    • Look at what kind of media deliver the best quality of printing and whether the printer requires a special kind of media like inkjet to get better results (media can be very expensive). Usually colour toner base can deliver very good quality when printing on regular office paper.
    • Look for a network printer if you are looking for a business printer, then look if there is soft tools to manage the printer and are they free or you have to pay for them and finally how easy are they to use.
    • If you have a problem of not having enough space look for a MFP, please note if it is a business MFP then network is something you have to look for not just for printing as a feature but also scanning should be considered then you have to look for what kind of soft tools are provided for you to mange your documents

    Colours … your silent sales person!

    When designing your company’s logo, do you carefully consider your choice of colours or do you just keep trying colours till you see something you like? How about when designing your promotional materials? What about your customers, do you consider what colours appeal to them or do you just say “if it looks good they will like it?”  Many people still think that the effects of colours in business are purely cosmetic but appearance is very small part of the vital role it plays in impressing your customers. As simple as it may sounds, the colour thrust of your printed material whether brochures, presentations or reports, can open the initial door to your customer mind much more quickly than mere words.

    Colours can influence your business and customers in more ways than you could expect.  Colours are a powerful form of communication that derives from our deepest instinct and it’s always in play. Customers’ immediate response will always be to the colours first. They are the first thing we look for to give us information about everything that confronts us. Understanding colour psychology and how it works helps you use colours to influence your customers’ responses to your products and printed materials.

    In one of the latest reports in collaboration with OKI Printing solutions, one of the world’s largest colour printer manufacturers, we managed to lay down some guidelines to help business owners harness the power of colours, when producing their own in-house colour documents. There are two things you have to consider; harmony and reactions to colours.  It’s a scientific fact that we do not respond to one colour – but to all the colours we see; there is no bad colour, just bad colour combinations. One of the most common mistakes businesses make is that of leaving the corporate colours out of the equation when they decide to produce an important promotional document. Every colour you are considering for your document should go with each of the logo colours, this will ensure that the whole document serves to enhance and reinforce your company values, and there are no mixed messages. Colour documents in general provoke between 60 and 70% more response than black and white. However, using colour for the sake of colour can be counterproductive.

    So how can you choose the right colour for your materials?

    It is commonly thought that red is always a winning colour for a corporate because red stimulates us physically and communicates strength and power. However – before you rush to red for your logo or other printed materials, please pause for a moment: there is no such thing as a universally good colour. Red is potentially exhilarating and exciting but if it is not right for your brand, it can be horribly aggressive, demanding and a strain. Impact for its own sake is not enough.

    In a research sponsored by OKI Printing Solutions we established that response to colour is a psychophysical, universal phenomenon that works on two levels:

    Each of the eleven main colours has its own universal effect; that is the first level. However, in practice the effect can be positive or negative. Once you understand what each main colour communicates, decide which one best captures the most positive aspects of your business and then treat that colour with great respect; make sure that you never forget to pay attention to the colours you use with it, so that it always looks good and evokes a positive response.

    To make things easier we cracked the main colours code to help you understand their psychological effect

    Red:

    Positive: Physical courage, strength, warmth, energy, basic survival, stimulation, masculinity, excitement

    Negative: Defiance, aggression, visual impact, strain

    Red has the property of appearing closer than it is, and therefore catches the attention first – it has the most ‘stand-out’.

    Used wrongly, it can be perceived as a strain – aggressive and very harsh.

    If you are selling consumer goods, if your company has anything to do with sport or physical activity, has retail outlets trading in leisure activity or the home, or your business needs to appeal more to the senses than to the mind, red will work well.

    Blue:

    Positive: Intelligence, communication, trust, efficiency, serenity, duty, logic, coolness, reflection, calm

    Negative: Coldness, aloofness, lack of emotion, unfriendliness.

    Blue is the colour of the mind. Strong blues stimulate clear thought and soft blues aid concentration. We instinctively associate blue with clarity and with things working efficiently

    Used wrongly it could be perceived as cold, unfriendly and bureaucratic.

    Blue will work very well if you need your customers to trust you – solicitors, accountants, insurance companies, technology companies and roofing contractors.

    Yellow:

    Positive: Optimism, confidence, self-esteem, extraversion, emotional strength, friendliness, creativity

    Negative: Irrationality, fear, emotional fragility, depression, anxiety

    Yellow is a warm, bright, uncomplicated colour and it stimulates the ego and emotions.

    Used wrongly it can cause anxiety, and when used with black it sends a strong signal of danger.

    Yellow is an effective colour if you are communicating anything new, or anything associated with the young. It is, however, quite a difficult colour to use in graphic design because, oddly, it is not as visible as other colours

    Green:

    Positive: Harmony, balance, refreshment, rest, restoration, reassurance, environmental awareness, peace

    Negative: Boredom, stagnation, blandness, enervation

    Green is the colour of balance; it strikes the eye at a point where no adjustment is necessary in order to look at it, so it is restful.

    Used wrongly it can be stagnant and far too bland, encourages stillness and lack of action.

    The reassurance of green will be effective for just about any organisation, but particularly for a business whose customers are likely to be tense or nervous – e.g. doctors, dentists or anything medical, or driving schools.

    Violet

    Positive: spiritual awareness, containment, vision, luxury, authenticity, truth, quality

    Negative: introversion, decadence, suppression, inferiority.

    Often described as Purple, it turns energy in, rather than out, and soothes the emotions.

    Used wrongly, purple can come across as false, and reflect anything but premium quality.

    Purple will work well for any company concerned with the New Age, or who are selling the finest quality goods at the top of the market.

    Orange

    Positive: Physical comfort, food, warmth, security, sensuality, passion, abundance, fun

    Negative: Deprivation, frustration, frivolity, immaturity.

    Orange stimulates the body and the emotions. It is sensual, and activates awareness of secondary survival issues – food, warmth, shelter and physical enjoyment.

    Used wrongly it could reflect lack of seriousness, or intellectual values.

    Orange is the most powerful colour for selling food, heating systems, anything associated with home comfort – and pure fun. 

    Pink

    Positive: physical tranquility, nurture, warmth, femininity, love, sexuality, survival of the species

    Negative: inhibition, emotional claustrophobia, emasculation, physical weakness  

    Pink is physically soothing and nurturing; it represents the feminine principle, motherhood and survival of the species.

    Used wrongly it can be physically draining and men will find too much of it emasculating.

    If you are selling feminine products of any kind, lingerie, cosmetics or women’s fashions, pink will capture that essential femininity. Strong fuchsia is the colour of militant feminism!

    Brown: 

    Positive: Seriousness, warmth, nature, earthiness, reliability, support

    Negative: Lack of humour, heaviness, lack of sophistication.

    Brown is essentially a serious colour it is always the best colour to communicate no-nonsense, down-to-earth ideas.

    Used wrongly it could be perceived as humourless and heavy.

    Brown would probably not be a strong enough colour to be effective as a main corporate colour. However, if your business is anything to do with the environment, or the natural world, brown is a far more effective secondary colour than black.

    Black:

    Positive: Sophistication, glamour, security, emotional safety, efficiency, substance

    Negative: Oppression, coldness, menace, heaviness

    It is a cold colour and uncompromising; it can be menacing. It certainly is not neutral. It can be very effective in communicating sophisticated elegance, materially aspirational products and glamour. Don’t use black with red for your company if you do not want to remind people of the aggressive and arrogant attitudes of the Third Reich!

    White:

    Positive: Hygiene, Sterility, clarity, purity, cleanness, simplicity, sophistication, efficiency

    Negative: Sterility, coldness, barriers, unfriendliness, elitism

    Pure white can be a cold and uncompromising colour because it reflects all wavelengths, thus creating barriers. It is a very strong colour, with a very strong psychology – not by any means, as is widely thought, neutral. It is aspirational and communicates uncompromising quality, hygiene, sterility and attention to detail.

    If you wish to use white for your company, make sure the colours with it are cold and sharp; if you use it with the kind of warm friendly colours that most companies favour, it will turn them from warm and friendly to cheap, and possibly aggressive.

    Grey

    Positive: Psychological neutrality

    Negative: Lack of confidence, dampness, depression, hibernation, lack of energy

    People will tell you that grey is elegant. Sadly, except under very specific circumstances, this is not so. Grey says virtually nothing, and usually indicates lack of confidence. It is never to be recommended in any corporate communication.

    So the next time you plan designing any of your promotional materials consider well your choice of colours and remember that they are your silent sales person.

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